Showing posts with label blog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label blog. Show all posts

Sunday, July 10, 2016

On #AuthorsBehavingBadly Online and What to Do So I Will Never Buy Their Books EVER | YA Talk



Many people who are active in the blogging community have probably interacted with authors at some point or have witnessed their interactions with other readers. 

Here are some things I've witnessed. Feel free to add your own stories.

Note: I won't mention any names here, only paraphrase stories that have already gone viral, cause, ya know, the message of this post is bullying isn't cool. Also they're sort of old news.



  • What not to do on twitter

Subtweeting on twitter and/or talking down to their readers and/or bloggers.

Every year around BEA or ALA time we have the same spiel. The old discussion whether bloggers deserve to be at conventions because some excessively snatch ARCs and sell them online.  And every year my so-called Blacklist of authors who will never gain any exposure or profit from me grows. It's value to know when not to say anything at all - there are enough authors who are hateful and mean towards bloggers.

It's not cool to write mean things about the people that essentially pay your bills by buying and/or reviewing your stuff.

Retweeting people who subtweet readers and bloggers. 

Retweeting seems like an easy way to state your opinion without actually having to talk trash. While it's very tempting, to me this doesn't make it any different from you writing an actual tweet. It makes you all the less sympathetic because I'll just think you're too cowardly to actually say what you're thinking in the fear that people may quote you.

I always wonder whether these people would actually dare to say these things to people's faces, there are too many authors to mention who are ready to hate on any and everyone who doesn't agree with them. Bullying is never cool, especially not if you're in the public eye. You're a role model for people. Remember that.

  • What not to do on Goodreads

Goodreads is a great platform for readers to discover new books and authors to get more exposure. But apparently, some people just don't understand the concept of boundaries.

Too often I see authors commenting on reviews, trying to justify their work, and too often this leaves reviewers startled. 

A particular case that gained quite the noticeable amount of attention is that of a well-known author attacking a well-known blogger and basically slandering them publicly because they didn't like their book, leaving anonymous comments, basically cyberstalking them and calling them out everywhere. The story even made it to Publishers Weekly.

Or that one author who showed up at a reviewer's house after they left a negative review on Goodreads. That story made it to The Guardian, of course, putting all the blame on the reviewer.

Stuff like this makes me want to quit blogging completely and tell everyone else to as well. So incredibly disappointing and discouraging - usually you see authors say "hey, please review my book it helps me so much" - but then you see other authors do stuff like that.


  • What not to do on your personal blog

While I am very much for freedom of speech and consider blogs to generally be a safe space, authors don't have the privilege of being able to "say what they want" because it's "their blog".

I think a certain degree of professionalism is a must for authors. It's a privilege to be a published writer, and one of the downsides is that people aren't going to like controversial (negative) opinions coming from them.

I've seen authors talk trash about negative reviews, complain, complain, complain about how reviewers aren't understanding their book, and generally being bitter about the lack of success.  Even screenshotting bad reviews and inviting their followers to attack the reviewer!

Think for a second here - what benefit does this serve? Do you genuinely think this is helping? Helping me to decide whose book not to buy, maybe.


  • What not to do on tumblr

Tumblr is known for its avid fandom culture. People make edits, people write fan fiction, and people ship characters. It all stops being fun when the author decides it's "hello kids I'm here to ruin the fun " time and starts to comment on every single headcanon of their book and to state what's actually canon according to them. 

Again, this isn't a "I witnessed this one time" thing. This happens quite often and i physically do not understand why authors think it's okay to barge in on fan conversations.

  • If they get tagged or receive a personal message, okay! Be my guest, glad you replied! 
  • If someone actively reaches out to them and ASKS them, okay! 
  • BUT don't just search a tag and decide to ruin everyone's fun by telling them how wrong they are one by one.

The thing is- people can see you, dear authors. 

People check your social media, typically after they have read one of your books or are planning to buy one. It's so, so, so important to keep your mouth shut about some topics that may offend. I'm not saying that you can't express opinions, but sprouting offensive and hateful non-sense and treating your readers horribly doesn't seem like a smart idea, does it? 

If you're one of those people that has too many opinions that may offend, hire a publicist to handle your official account and post your opinions on your personal, non-public account.



The four golden rules for authors on social media

  1. Don't say anything that you wouldn't say in an interview in person
  2. Don't talk trash about the people who pay your bills, oh my god, I can't believe I actually have to say this
  3. Don't chime in on conversations about your book that no one invited you to
  4. DON'T BE A BULLY


Who is on your author blacklist?



More on the Author / Reader relationship:
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Saturday, April 9, 2016

Why I Almost Gave Up Blogging






I've been doing this for over a year now. I publish at least 10 posts a month, always reading, writing, and collecting ideas. My blog queue is stocked with 30+ posts at all times. But it wasn't always like this.

Blogging Is Hard

I know everyone says this, but let me tell you once more: after the honeymoon phase where you're new to everything and discovering new things is fun and great and awesome, you'll eventually get into a big blogging slump.

For me, the first slump came when I realized how hard it is to get your name out there. Without constantly promoting and commenting on other blogs, you're not going anywhere. Readers won't suddenly appear out of the blue.

Nobody can find your blog if you're not advertising for it. And this exactly what I didn't understand as a new blogger. I thought that mouth-to-mouth propaganda would work, people hear about my content from others and discover my blog. But in reality, that rarely happens, especially not for small blogs.

I didn't have the time or motivation to do this long-term, to keep advertising, to keep commenting excessively on other blogs. I salute everyone who can do this and has been doing this for several years. I just grew tired of it and wondered why my views stagnated and I lost more readers than I gained new ones.
Blog-Envy Is A Thing

To me, it was definitely jealousy that made me want to give up blogging and sent me into a full-blown phase of not wanting to write posts at all anymore. I wanted instant results, solely based on my content. Of course, this isn't how it works.
  • I saw blogs that were very new and had already more followers than me.
  • I saw blogs that didn't live up to my standards and that I considered bad, but still had more followers. 
  • I wondered what I was doing wrong, because I had such a small following, but considered myself better than some bloggers who had more. Something you should never ever do. You're not better than anyone, whether you're a new or well-known blogger.
I'm still a small blog and I've come to terms with that, but when you're surrounded by a billion bloggers who get more than a thousand views per day, you'll feel even smaller.
The thing that got me out of this slump was the realization that I'm not blogging for success. I'm blogging for me, and to help the people that read my blog, however big that number is.

Because let's face it: Hardly any book bloggers can make a living off their blogs. If you can, you've probably been at it for years, or are just plastering your blog with a billion adverts, or are just a natural. It's the minority.

Why It All Doesn't Matter Anyways

Maybe some of you had phases like this, maybe some of you will in the future. The point I want to make is that it doesn't matter what others are doing, it doesn't matter how many followers you have or haven't. Blog for yourself. Remember why you started doing this and keep on working towards whichever goal you have.


Did You Ever Consider Stopping Blogging?

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Thursday, October 1, 2015

How to Leave a Bad First Impression With Your Blog | Book Blogging Tips (#19)


The first impression is vital. Within seconds most readers decide whether they want to stay and follow or just click onto the next blog.

There are a few ways to ensure that you'll lose a good chunk of potential readers - without doing anything. 

I compiled a few things that I know bother not only me but quite a few people when they discover new blogs.

  • Incredibility
You just love everything you read. 5 Stars for all the books!! You just can't contain your enthusiasm for EVERY book that you read.

  • Giveaways and Book Blitzes
Doing some of them is fine. When you favorite authors are hosting giveaways for their new releases it can be a nice treat for your readers to inform them of that. But just posting the links to Rafflecopter giveaways that you aren't hosting .... ? Yeah, I probably won't follow you. Ever.

  • Ignoring all comments
Having a blog is hard, we all know that. Sometimes you don't find the time to reply to all comments, but never? Really? Why do you think should anyone bother to comment if you won't talk to them?

  • Too many ads
Yeah, I know that we all have to make a living somehow. But unless you're one of the big names out there, it won't financially cripple you to take two out of the ten advertisements on your blog down. While you're at it, delete the pop-out, no matter what it says.

  • Copy-Cat Syndrome
Wait... didn't I just see the exact same post on another blog? If plagiarism is an alien concept to you and you take the word inspiration literally and steal other people's posts - well, I'm not interested in reading your blog.

  • Terrible theme and a cluttered side bar
It just messes up the first impression. If you use Comic Sans as a script and showcase your 32739 fandom banners and your blog design is a mess, what am I supposed to expect from the content of your blog? Less is more, my friend.

What ruins the first impression of a blog for you?


Come back next Thursday for a new Book Blogging Tips Post!

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Thursday, July 16, 2015

6 Things Your Blog Design HAS TO Have | Book Blogging Tips (#8)


Bloggers know the eternal struggle: How to find the perfect design. 

If you're a little like me, you're constantly changing and trying to improve things to make your design the best it can be.

While taste differs, there are 6 things your blog absolutely has to have.




1. A Proper Comment System

With proper I mean no pop-ups, no captcha, no google+ only (for the Blogger people)
If you make it nice and easy to comment, you'll definitely see more people making use of that option. The default systems of Blogger and Wordpress are fine, but more and more bloggers make use of other commenting systems.

Popular third-party-commenting systems are:
2. Contact Page

This is important for networking. Whether it's other bloggers or authors and publishers wanting to contact you. If you haven't already, get an email address specifically for your blog. Social media icons are also a nice way to give your readers an overview where they can find and connect with you

3. Related Posts Widget

I didn't have this for a long time and I actually don't know how I could live without this. Related posts are a great way to show your reader similar stuff and also look nice on your home page.
The widget I use is LinkWithin.

4. Multiple Options for Following

I've actually seen blogs with only one option to follow. While I understand that everyone has their preferred way that they'd like to be followed by, note that not everyone might want to use this. Consider adding at least two of the options below:
  • Email
  • Google Friend Connect
  • BlogConnect
  • BlogLovin
  • Facebook
  • G+
  • Linky
  • NetworkedBlogs
The more options you give your readers, the more followers you'll be able to get.

5. Search Bar

This goes without saying. People have to be able to find content that's not on the first page easily.

6. Review Index

This is essential (!!!) for book bloggers. Your readers have to be able to find your reviews and please put it on a separate page. 
Just linking to all posts you tagged as reviews doesn't really help, especially if you combine this with not having a search bar. Make the effort to add a page just for reviews and sort them.


What Do You Think Every Blogger Has to Have on Their Blog?


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