Showing posts with label posts. Show all posts
Showing posts with label posts. Show all posts

Friday, July 29, 2016

How often should YOU post per week? | Book Blogging Tips (#43)


I often find myself absolutely overwhelmed by this question.

I don't want to be that guy who posts too much or too little. I take blogging ridiculously seriously, I want to put quality content out there regularly.

But all the time I ask myself - am I really posting often enough or too often?

Looking at other bloggers, they seem to either post every day or every other day or every week, and I never know what works for me.

Just like everything in blogging, there won't be a general answer I can give you, it's all up to your personal preference and blogging needs. But the thing I can give you is a list of pros and cons of the different frequencies of blogging.

1.) Once per month
+ super easy-going, one post per month is an easy frequency to keep up for a long time
+ no stressful blogging!
- it'll be difficult to build a strong reader base unless that one post you post every month is phenomenal and you really found your niche
- readers prefer a higher frequency
- very little content
- you're absolutely limited in the things you can say in a single post
- lots of publishers demand that you post daily or almost daily if you want review copies

Recommended for: niche blogs, directory-type of blogs (if you post a lot of lists and links), established blogs

2.) Once per week
+ easy to keep up for a long time
+ not very stressful
+ 4 times per month is definitely enough content to put out
- some readers prefer a higher frequency
- you might have difficulties
- lots of publishers demand that you post daily or almost daily if you want review copies

Recommended for: all blogs, blogs with mostly original content

3.) Multiple times per week
+ lots of publishers demand that you post daily or almost daily if you want review copies
+ usually the preferred frequency of most readers
- can get stressful, it's quite a lot of content!
- you should look into scheduling to keep this up

Recommended for: all blogs, blogs with mixed content (reviews, memes, original)

4.) Multiple times per day
+ lots of publishers demand that you post daily or almost daily if you want review copies
+ pretty much no limitation in what you can say
+ so many possibilities to post different things and put a crap ton of content out there
- readers get annoyed by people who post this often very quickly
- very high possibility of accidentally making it spam-y (as in, posting a lot of low-quality stuff just for the sake of posting)
- it doesn't get more stressful than this if you can keep this up, you're probably a witch
- if you don't schedule, this is pretty much blogging hell, coming up with a couple of posts every day isn't ideal

Recommended for: meme blogs (seriously, how can you keep this up without doing a lot of memes), blogs with multiple hosts

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Thursday, January 28, 2016

When To Post ARC Reviews: Pros and Cons of Posting On Release Day or Months Before | Book Blogging Tips (#36)





What I do is usually very simple. The second I get the ARC, I read it and then queue the review to be published exactly on the release day, or if I can't, I schedule it for the day before.

However, recent discussions about this with other bloggers made me contemplate whether there's a better method.

Usually it's expected of you to have the review ready and online by the time the book is released. That's why you're getting the ARC, to deliver instant reviews even when the book has only been out for half a second.

When you get an ARC, you usually have three(ish) options when to post the review

1) The second you finish (~3-6 months before release)

+ Even if that's months ahead, you already got it out of the way
+ There's no chance you'll forget about the book
- Literally nobody cares about a book that'll be published in a couple of months time
- Honestly, not even if it's Rick Riordan or Richelle Mead, one week after the announcement people stop caring = ZERO publicity profit
if somebody sees the review and wants the book, they can't get it yet. 

2) Close to the due date (~a week before release)

+ everybody knows the book is coming, everybody's searching for early reviews
+ traffic!!!
+ simultaneously early enough to create buzz around the book (publicists likey), but also late enough to make the release seem very close and get people excited (readers likey)
- if somebody sees the review and wants the book, they can't get it yet. 
- you'll have to plan this one ahead, either read the book right away and queue the post, or pray to God you'll make it in time

3) Last minute (on release day)

+ everybody knows the book is out, hello traffic
+ if you got somebody interested in the book, they can get it right away
- again, either queue or pray
- you won't be able to get people interested in the book before its release

4) #yolo

Of course you still have the "screw it" option, where you just post the review whenever. But in order to do that you really have to have your life/TBR together enough to manage to keep track of all your review copies. Because nothing's worse than requesting an ARC and not delivering a review at all. Don't do that. 

When in doubt:

Ask the publicist that you've been in contact with and don't listen to people online who are probably working with different publishers and publicists that also have different expectations of you.



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Thursday, January 21, 2016

How Queuing Posts Makes Blogging 200% Easier | Book Blogging Tips (#35)



What's a Queue?

A super convenient blog function that enables you to schedule posts days, weeks, months, or even years in advance.


Why is a Queue Important?

90% of my blog runs on a queue. 
I couldn't imagine running my blog without it. With a queue, you don't have to worry every day about coming up with a new topic. When you're feeling down and not feeling like writing, your blog will just write itself. Isn't that nice?


Regardless whether your blog is more memes or original posts - you'll probably face creative blocks sooner or later. If it wasn't for my queue I would have quit blogging very early on or just only published posts sporadically. 
A queue is a super handy way of staying on top of things and give your readers content regularly.

You do not have to queue!
I'm not saying that everyone should, but it helped me personally tremendously. I wouldn't be blogging anymore if it weren't for my queue. Sometimes I just face creative blocks and just can't write any more posts and don't have the energy or motivation to write up anything.

How Big Should It Be?
My queue is usually stacked with about thirty posts, spanning maybe two or three months ahead. Obviously my blog doesn't run completely on queue.

What Should You Queue?

Everything that's either:
  • timeless (aka original posts like discussions or personal stuff)
  • memes (if you know the topics in advance)
Avoid queueing posts that are relevant right now (tackling a topic that's all over social media right now for example). Only queue posts that you know won't get fewer or more hits regardless of when you post them.

When Should You Queue?

I started queuing when I noticed that I couldn't keep on writing up posts the same day they'd go online. That was maybe in my first or second month of blogging. Try using your creative highs to write up as many posts as you can! You don't have to stack your queue with a few dozen posts at all times like me, start small. Draft maybe five or more posts and keep collecting before you start queuing.

Do You Queue Posts in Advance? 



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