Showing posts with label review copy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label review copy. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Read Only Popular Newly-Released Books? NAH! Reasons to Read Backlist Books




In the blogosphere you'll often notice that many bloggers seem to only be reviewing popular books. There are many reasons for that, free review copies, the hype around those books, or simply just seeing them in a bookstore and being unable to resist. 

Whichever reasons you may have for predominantly reading new books, allow me to introduce another concept: b a c k l i s t books.

What's a backlist book?

A backlist book is a book that has been out for quite some time. It's typically not promoted as much anymore, and probably not hyped as much anymore.

But won't reviewing "old" books impact my views negatively?

I mean, it's no secret that reviews aren't necessarily the way to go if you care a LOT about your views and only want to post stuff that will possibly blow up and go viral. Whether you review backlist or frontlist books, you won't get a lot views either way. 

But the thing is, not all bloggers are always on the lookout for the newest books. And bloggers aren't your only readers anyway, there are lots of people who read book blogs but don't blog themselves. And they won't have the faintest idea what you recently got in your inbox, what book just got sent out to reviewers and is everything everyone is reading. 

From experience, my own and that of others, I know that most people either go for reviews of 

a) books they have read                   or                      b) books they have heard a lot about. 

And either can be backlist or frontlist. It really, really, really doesn't matter to your readers what you review. If you are still skeptical, go for backlist books that have a lot of reviews and generally have been popular.

But why should I even read them?

Because it helps the authors and publishers tremendously! And we all should generally just stop always chasing the newest hit, this is super boring, don't you think? 
  • Imagine a world in which authors only get buzz in the first year that their book is out. 
  • Imagine a world in which you can't be a successful author unless you put out a new book every year. 
Sounds boring, doesn't it.

Backlist books don't bite, I don't get why this is even an issue I have to address. Do you purposely walk past book stores and not buy what's on sale unless it's a brand new book? C'mon. Stop this. Review backlist and frontlist, guys. 

Do you read backlist or frontlist books or a mix of both?

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Thursday, December 10, 2015

How to Deal With DNFs | Book Blogging Tips (#29)


We've all had it and we all dread it. DNF-ing a book is probably one of the worst things to happen to a book blogger. 

But sometimes you just don't want to finish a book and that's perfectly okay. 

What is a DNF?
A DNF is a book you did not finish for what reason ever.



Why It's Okay
Not all books are for everyone. 
You have to think like this: If you're forcing yourself to finish every single book you start, you'll miss out on a lot of great books while you're stuck reading the shitty ones. Life is too short to torture yourself with bad literature. Don't feel bad because your taste doesn't match with every single thing you read.

I've even DNF-ed books and afterwards went on to ask a friend who read it about what happened next. If you simply don't feel like the writing clicks with you - don't read it. You're under no obligation to finish any book.

When to DNF
  • You don't have any enthusiasm left for the book, you're dreading every page you have to read. When is it over again?
  • You dislike the characters so much that you've just stopped caring about their journey
  • The author pulls an unforgiveable faux-pas
  • The plot is too graphic, too emotional, too violent etc. for your taste
  • Poor langugae makes you have to guess what the author is trying to tell you
  • Copy cats: Haven't you seen this somewhere else? 

As you see, there are millions of reasons to DNF a book. If yours is not on this list I'm not even surprised. You can DNF for thousands of reasons and every single one is a justified and perfectly okay reason to.

What if it's an ARC?

Actually, most publishers I've worked with state in a the package leaflet that it's okay if you dislike a book. You don't even have to DNF it- if you flat out change your mind about wanting to read a review copy , you should send your contact an email. 

Most publishers are very considerate. You can even send the copy to another blogger for review and inform your industry contact. You don't even have to be specific as to why you didn't want to read the review copy after all. Just be respectful and state that the book wasn't for you.

With review copies though I have a minimum of 50 pages for every book to get me hooked. Don't DNF if you've only read ten pages, especially not with review copies, that's just disrespectful. 


How do you handle DNFs?

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