Showing posts with label social media. Show all posts
Showing posts with label social media. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Should You Separate Bookish and Personal Social Media Accounts? | Book Blogging Tips (#63)

We all have social media accounts that may or may not go with our blogs. We all know social media is important to grow your blog, but should you separate the two?

I very often see bloggers who have one account for their blog and one that's personal. In order to determine which one works best for you, you first have to assess what kind of blog you have.



First check if you have a personal blog or a general blog. 

  • Personal blogs are blogs that just focus on your own reading habits, maybe ocassionally featuring guest posts, but generally just feature what you think and what you're reading. 
  • A more general book blog would be a blog with multiple regular contributors that doesn't just feature reviews but has lots of cover reveals, guest posts, rec lists, etc.
A social media account for a personal blog would feel oddly empty, considering that most of us personal bloggers don't put out more than maybe 3-5 posts per week. What would you be posting the other days then? Social media very much relies on regular content and if you have the content to fill it up with, by all means. 

The reason why you're making a social media account for your blog is typically to make the whole thing seem less like "this is the blog of XY" and more like "this is a blog about X". Ask yourself - do you really need to dissociate yourself from your blog if it's a personal one? Another thing to consider is that people on social media tend to follow for the unique, constant content. 

Examples and questions to ask if you have a personal blog:

Let's say you'll make a special account for your blog only on...

Twitter: You'll use it to crosspost your posts there every time they go live. What else would you do during the times your blog doesn't have any content? Twitter is a medium that relies on constant (opinionated) content. Keeping your account neutral would make it  look oddly empty. You'll have to constantly retweet other accounts or interact with other accounts to add some more content. 
Verdict: Maybe

Instagram: If you have the motivation and patience to set up a blog-only instagram featuring pictures of your current reads and all, sure! You can certainly do both in one account though. Your call.
Verdict: Sure, if you like

Tumblr: Again, same as with twitter. You'll have to add third-party content to your account to make it worth it. 
Verdict: Maybe

Facebook: Plenty of blogs have a facebook site. I think it's actually a very good idea to separate your blog from your personal facebook. It would only make things messy to combine the two.
Verdict: Yes!

At the end of the day you decide what works best and maybe it's a little bit trial and error. Go ahead and make that social media page specifically for your blog if you like, delete it if you dislike it. Easy like that.

Do you have separate accounts for social media?

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Sunday, May 21, 2017

[Review] Follow Me Back (#1) - A.V. Geiger: Twitter and Pop Stars

In FOLLOW ME BACK, pop star Eric Thorn sets up a fake twitter account and falls in love with one of his fans.

What intrigued me: Mixed format books are always a treat.

Romance-heavy page turner

FOLLOW ME BACK is an absolute page-turner. There is just something about this story that's captivating, especially through the mixed format with police interviews and tweets, it keeps you on your toes at all times. Even when the story gets a little too repetitive for my taste, I couldn't quit simply because I needed to find out how it all gets resolved. 

The thing is, FOLLOW ME BACK needs you to like these characters. A huge chunk of this book is spent watching protagonists Eric and Tessa fall in love through flirty DMs. I think in some way this really takes away from the premise. I would've loved a more thriller-centric story instead of a flat out romance with a side of a looming secret (that's not even that hard to guess early really)

At the end of the day, FOLLOW ME BACK has it going for it that this is every teenage girl's fantasy: the book. Your favorite celebrity is talking to you through a fake account and you'll fall in love. But FOLLOW ME BACK got a dark twist going on that really makes this story one of a kind. 


Fan fiction tropes galore

FOLLOW ME BACK's biggest problem is that the story isn't very strong. It reads like the mixed format has been slapped on (especially the police reports) after the whole thing was written to increase the lack of tension within this narrative. There is one mystery at the center of it that I don't find is explored as cleverly as you'd expect from a social media thriller. It reads like a cheap plot twist to set up the next sequel to this romance. It's a typical fan fiction trope. In general, this reads absolutely like fan fiction, which I assumed it used to be, since the author is well-known on Wattpad for her Maroon 5 fan fiction. 

This isn't a bad thing whatsoever. I like fan fiction every now and then and am familiar and quite a bit fond of these tropes and types of stories. But I think the average reader of traditionally published YA will probably be a little put off by this story. It's really a niche thing but I'd sincerely hope that it takes off. FOLLOW ME BACK is an addicting story of love and obsession that probably everyone can identify a little with. 


Rating:

★★★½☆

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

If you're a fan fiction reader or have a celebrity crush that's a musician, you'll probably love FOLLOW ME BACK. It's fresh, it's fun, it's different. The mixed media format really makes this one stand out and quite interesting.

[If you have agoraphobia and have reviewed this, please link your review. I'd love to feature it.]


Additional Info

Published: June 6th 2017
Pages: 368
Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire
Genre: YA / Thriller
ISBN: 9781492645238

Synopsis:
"Tessa Hart’s world feels very small. Confined to her bedroom with agoraphobia, her one escape is the online fandom for pop sensation Eric Thorn. When he tweets to his fans, it’s like his speaking directly to her…

Eric Thorn is frightened by his obsessive fans. They take their devotion way too far. It doesn’t help that his PR team keeps posting to encourage their fantasies.

When a fellow pop star is murdered at the hands of a fan, Eric knows he has to do something to shatter his online image fast—like take down one of his top Twitter followers. But Eric’s plan to troll @TessaHeartsEric unexpectedly evolves into an online relationship deeper than either could have imagined. And when the two arrange to meet IRL, what should have made for the world’s best episode of Catfish takes a deadly turn…"(Source: Goodreads)


Do you read fan fiction?

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Monday, December 19, 2016

When Authors Reply to Reviews and Why This is a Problem | #AuthorsBehavingBadly

I've talked about #AuthorsBehavingBadly on Social Media in general before, but replying to reviews is a whole different matter that absolutely deserves its own post in my opinion.
Many authors who have just had their first book published and are slowly getting their first reviews or are simply not very active and well-versed in book community etiquette, will probably end up doing this.

Not all authors who comment on reviews have a malicious intention and I'm going to start of talking about those authors that really -just didn't know- they aren't supposed to comment.


Scenario 1: You wrote a good review and the author is commenting to say something nice

Why it's not cool
While this is clearly just a nice gesture of the author, or at least meant as such, this is an invasion of safe space. Reviewers sort-of exist in this bubble universe of the book industry. Iit's absolutely okay to share a positive review of your book that you liked, that's what they're for after all - but oh boy, please, please don't comment. Not even to say thanks. Just don't. Tweet the review if you like, share the link if you like, we appreciate it, but please don't comment.

When it's okay
Should you have gotten tagged in the review, this is a whole other story.

See, it all comes down to consent. Reviewers aren't interested in discussions with authors unless they are actively seeking those out. I wouldn't be reviewing if any and every author commented on my reviews. It just doesn't feel safe, you're feeling obligated to be nicer than you usually would have, you're not really able to express your opinion without cringing at the thought of the author reading it - it's just a mess.

So unless you have been sent the review, your comment isn't wanted.

Scenario 2: You wrote a negative review and the author is going "um, actually" on you


Why it's not cool
This is probably the nightmare of every reviewer. Having to justify yourself to the artist. - I get it, your books are your babies and you poured your heart and soul into this, but welcome to the real world. People will dislike your work and it will happen frequently and this is a thing you have to be able to deal with professionally, else, you're probably not in the right industry. 

I'm sorry but this is just making thing unnecessarily hard for everyone. The reviewer's irritated, the author's probably angry, the possible readers are weirded out. Why would you want that?

When it's okay
No matter what the reviewer said and no matter how much you think they're wrong, doing this is never ever ever ever ever okay. Even if you are sent a review, bashing reviewers is a no no. 


"Okay, so you say this isn't good, but I'm still going to comment, I don't care. They're wrong, I'm going to call them out."

The thing is, I'm addressing this in the first place because it is a problem. Recently a dear friend of mine has quit blogging after an author with a medium-sized following decided to unleash their fury on them. 

  • Completely ignoring that this is cyberbullying - is that really the message you want to convey?
  • To have bloggers be scared to be scalded whenever they leave a negative review?
  • To make bloggers want to quit reviewing?
Time and time again I have to say that reviewers deserve respect, that we are a vital part of the publishing industry and that without us, many NYT-bestselling authors wouldn't be where they are right now.


So what have we learned?
  • Reviewers want their safe space and deserve their safe space
  • Respecting boundaries also includes biting your tongue when encountering negative reviews
  • Putting negativity into the world will probably come to bite you in the butt eventually. (RE: the stories of the cyberstalking/cyberbullying authors who aren't selling books anymore now, you know the ones)


How do you feel about authors replying to your reviews? 

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Monday, April 11, 2016

[Review] Follow Me Back - Nicci Cloke: Unreliable Narrators, Disappearances, and Douchebags




In FOLLOW ME BACK, Aidan's classmate Lizzie disappears. When he gets approached by her best friend Marnie, they start investigating her disappearance.

What intrigued me: The cover promises an interesting mystery involving social media.

Why should we care?

FOLLOW ME BACK really isn't what it promises to be. I got teased by the cover and the premise surrounding the disappearance. Sadly, there isn't much to this book aside from this. The biggest problem this novel has is that there is no reason for the reader to care about Lizzie. GONE GIRL for example, works with a similar premise but makes sure to add little snippets to familiarize the reader with the disappeared character and makes sure that we care. I just missed that with FOLLOW ME BACK.

Like this, I wasn't interested in solving the mystery around Lizzie's disappearance and surely didn't root for Aidan either. The mere fact that this is advertised as being a novel including an unreliable narrator makes FOLLOW ME BACK insanely predictable, cliche, and boring. We know Aidan has something to do with it from the start, and therefore the plot twists don't come as a shock. The mundane scenes we have to go through for world establishing aren't helpful either. FOLLOW ME BACK really wants to be a thriller, but is only a mediocre mystery with very predictably acting, unlikable characters.

Social media is terrible and we're all going to die

FOLLOW ME BACK has a lot of potential. If I look over the fact that it's impossible to care for Lizzie, and that the mystery isn't really much of one - Aidan is a terrible main character. He hardly has any personality and frequently slut-shames and judges girls by their appearance, which I'm so, so, so tired of reading about. The whole story doesn't read like it's written from Aidan's perspective, really, because the narration is really shallow and he doesn't have a distinctive, memorable voice.

For being a book with a cover that insinuates having roots in social media, most of the novel just desperately tries to tell us how bad social media is and how dangerous and shallow it all is. I'm just not a fan of it. It reads like Cloke is talking down to her audience, seeming patronizing, and I cannot stand that. In the age of technology, social media is just necessary - this pseudo cautionary tale just doesn't work. Especially because none of the characters in FOLLOW ME BACK actually talk real teenagers do online. I was expecting more than just the occasional lazy conversation, more illustrations, more "following" and less "social media is bad and you're literally going to die if you use it."


Rating:

☆☆

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

FOLLOW ME BACK has the potential to be an interesting novel about a disappearance, much like Jennifer L. Armentrout's DON'T LOOK BACK, but really didn't grip me.


Additional Info

Published: February 4th 2016
Pages: 288
Publisher: Hot Key Books
Genre: YA / Thriller
ISBN: 9781471405082

Synopsis:
"A thrilling read, for fans of Gone Girl and We Were Liars.

There was no sign of a struggle, they whisper to each other. She took her phone but left her laptop behind.
Apparently, she'd met someone online, they write to each other in class, phones buzzing.
She ran away. She was taken.

The first time Aiden Kendrick hears about Lizzie Summersall's disappearance is when the police appear at his front door. He and Lizzie used to be friends; they aren't anymore. And when Aiden finds out that Lizzie had been talking to strangers on Facebook; that the police think she went to meet one of them, he begins to wonder how well he ever really knew her, and Aiden doesn't know it yet, but with Lizzie's disappearance his life is about to take a twisted and desperate turn.
 "(Source: Goodreads)

Do you like unreliable narrators?

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