Showing posts with label the selection. Show all posts
Showing posts with label the selection. Show all posts

Saturday, December 31, 2016

[Review] Soulmated (Joining of Souls #1) - Shaila Patel: Soulmates and Empaths

In SOULMATED, royal empath Liam is looking for his soulmate and finds them in Indian-American Laxshmi "Lucky" who has to choose between an arrange marriage with someone else or going to medical school.

What intrigued me: I love reading about soulmates.

World Building Issues

Part of why SOULMATED didn't work for me is probably that I had the wrong expectations. I was looking for something à la THE SELECTION, set in a fantasy world. SOULMATED is an Urban Fantasy book that doesn't read any differently than the average Contemporary. 

The fantasy elements aren't nearly as explored as I personally like my Urban Fantasy to be - Liam's empathy isn't explained in detail or even just introduced. You're just thrown into the cold water when it comes to him and that massively impacted how much I enjoyed the story. This is subjective, but I do like my fantasy to be laid out, explained, and properly introduced. Especially the empathy remains hardly explained and I'm still not sure if I understand how it works. In general there is very little mythology and world building behind all this to make it more captivating. It almost reads somewhat Magical Realist minus the world building necessary to qualify as such. 

Fantastic #Ownvoices POV

SOULMATED is told from a dual POV, one being Liam's and the other being Lucky's. This is #ownvoices book, meaning that it's written by an Indian American author - and oh boy, does that show. Lucky's POV is approximately a trillion times better executed and more fun than Liam's. I especially struggled with the way Patel tries to make him seem authentic through extremely aggressively Irish choice of words. It's really extremely heavy and does read very awkwardly. I can't say much for authenticity because I am not Irish - but it doesn't come as naturally and reads ... well, awkwardly. 

Lucky on the other hand is so much more interesting, her POVs flow seamlessly, the little nods to Indian culture, her complicated relationship with her mother who just wants her to become a doctor - ahhh. It's so good. I loved her and I loved following her storyline. In my opinion SOULMATED would have massively benefited from being told from a single POV and invested a little more in that world building. 

Together, Lucky and Liam are just adorable. I think that Patel definitely gets away with instant love in this case because this is literally the premise of SOULMATED and it does work pretty well! If you're generally a romance reader, SOULMATED is a treat for you.


Rating:

★★★½

 



Overall: Do I Recommend?

SOULMATED is probably a must-read for you if you're Indian American, love romance, or are just looking for an Indian heroine. Because it's quite sparse on the world building and the dual POV couldn't convince me, it didn't impress me, but that doesn't mean that you won't like it.



Additional Info

Published: January 24th 2017
Pages: 300
Publisher: Month9Books
Genre: YA / Urban Fantasy
ISBN: 9781944816643

Synopsis:
"Two souls. One Fate. 

Eighteen-year-old Liam Whelan, an Irish royal empath, has been searching for his elusive soulmate. The rare union will cement his family's standing in empath politics and afford the couple legendary powers, while also making them targets of those seeking to oust them.

Laxshmi Kapadia, an Indian-American high school student from a traditional family, faces her mother's ultimatum: Graduate early and go to medical school, or commit to an arranged marriage. 

When Liam moves next door to Laxshmi, he’s immediately and inexplicably drawn to her. In Liam, Laxshmi envisions a future with the freedom to follow her heart. 

Liam's father isn't convinced Laxshmi is "The One" and Laxshmi's mother won't even let her talk to their handsome new neighbor. Will Liam and Laxshmi defy expectations and embrace a shared destiny? Or is the risk of choosing one's own fate too great a price for the soulmated? "
(Source: Goodreads)


What's your favorite read with an Indian heroine?

Continue Reading...

Sunday, June 21, 2015

I Hate Love Triangles | YA Talk


Either you love them or you hate them.
Eventually every reader of YA will come across them. Love triangles seem to be trend that just won't get out of style.

What's a Love Triangle?
Love triangle commonly refers to the situation a protagonist of a novel finds themselves in when two different people are interested in them romantically.

Usually, the protagonist requites their affection or is in the process of learning to love them, hence leaving both love interest in competition with each other.

Some may say "Twilight" started it all, but I think we need to stop blaming Stephenie Meyer for everything that's going wrong in recent YA.

Popular Books about love triangles include
- "Delirium" by Lauren Oliver
- "City of Bones" by Cassandra Clare
- "The Selection" by Kiera Cass
- "Shatter Me" by Tahereh Mafi

Books with love triangles usually play with the "bad boy" character and the "guy next door". I've noticed that more often than I'd like to admit, at least one of them is a super problematic villain. Not sure how that makes any guy attractive though.

Here's What Bugs Me

Love triangles in theory are absolutely fine. If you're looking for them. If you love reading about them, great, but I'm just not. The market these days is FLOODED with hidden love triangles. Most of the times you can't even tell from the blurbs whether the books are all about the romance and only feature the actual topic of the book on the side.
which I am absolutely not. Love triangles never have and probably never will be something that I'm personally interested in.

I've encountered it numerous that I've tried to read a book, let's say, about angels descending their heavenly wrath on the Earth, only to find out that the novel is actually about a teenage girl falling in love with an angel and a demon (any relations to existing books are just coincidental).

This has ruined the reading experience for me so many times. Had I gone on looking for a love triangle and a girl stuck between the evil overlord and the brave hero, I would have bought a novel about that.

Every popular YA novel these days features a love triangle.

Realism? What is Realism?

If you'd live in a dystopian society where every day is a struggle for survival, your number one concern would probably not be which one of the super hot two guys you should choose. I mean, these days it's a miracle if you find a guy that's attractive, smart and respects you, let alone two! If you're seventeen, cut the odds in half.

Here's What I Demand!

There should be something like ESRB (Entertainment Software Rating Board) ratings for book romance like:
- N for no romance
- E for established romance
- X for multiple love interests
While I'm at it, there should be a rating for instant love, but I guess we can't have it all at once. I just want to be warned before I get invested in a book and then get drowned in love triangles. I actually did encounter novels with multiple love triangles, god knows why.

Do you like love triangles? 
Which novel do you think has portrayed them the best so far?


More YA Talk:
15-year-old Protagonists Confuse Me 
Mary Sues and Why We Need More of Them 
Instant Love and Why It Ruins Everything 
Hey Authors, Why Is LGBTQ Representation So Hard? 
I Fall For Problematic Love Interests 
Are Diverse Characters and Representation Unnecessary?

See All
Continue Reading...
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...