Showing posts with label tumblr. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tumblr. Show all posts

Sunday, July 10, 2016

On #AuthorsBehavingBadly Online and What to Do So I Will Never Buy Their Books EVER | YA Talk



Many people who are active in the blogging community have probably interacted with authors at some point or have witnessed their interactions with other readers. 

Here are some things I've witnessed. Feel free to add your own stories.

Note: I won't mention any names here, only paraphrase stories that have already gone viral, cause, ya know, the message of this post is bullying isn't cool. Also they're sort of old news.



  • What not to do on twitter

Subtweeting on twitter and/or talking down to their readers and/or bloggers.

Every year around BEA or ALA time we have the same spiel. The old discussion whether bloggers deserve to be at conventions because some excessively snatch ARCs and sell them online.  And every year my so-called Blacklist of authors who will never gain any exposure or profit from me grows. It's value to know when not to say anything at all - there are enough authors who are hateful and mean towards bloggers.

It's not cool to write mean things about the people that essentially pay your bills by buying and/or reviewing your stuff.

Retweeting people who subtweet readers and bloggers. 

Retweeting seems like an easy way to state your opinion without actually having to talk trash. While it's very tempting, to me this doesn't make it any different from you writing an actual tweet. It makes you all the less sympathetic because I'll just think you're too cowardly to actually say what you're thinking in the fear that people may quote you.

I always wonder whether these people would actually dare to say these things to people's faces, there are too many authors to mention who are ready to hate on any and everyone who doesn't agree with them. Bullying is never cool, especially not if you're in the public eye. You're a role model for people. Remember that.

  • What not to do on Goodreads

Goodreads is a great platform for readers to discover new books and authors to get more exposure. But apparently, some people just don't understand the concept of boundaries.

Too often I see authors commenting on reviews, trying to justify their work, and too often this leaves reviewers startled. 

A particular case that gained quite the noticeable amount of attention is that of a well-known author attacking a well-known blogger and basically slandering them publicly because they didn't like their book, leaving anonymous comments, basically cyberstalking them and calling them out everywhere. The story even made it to Publishers Weekly.

Or that one author who showed up at a reviewer's house after they left a negative review on Goodreads. That story made it to The Guardian, of course, putting all the blame on the reviewer.

Stuff like this makes me want to quit blogging completely and tell everyone else to as well. So incredibly disappointing and discouraging - usually you see authors say "hey, please review my book it helps me so much" - but then you see other authors do stuff like that.


  • What not to do on your personal blog

While I am very much for freedom of speech and consider blogs to generally be a safe space, authors don't have the privilege of being able to "say what they want" because it's "their blog".

I think a certain degree of professionalism is a must for authors. It's a privilege to be a published writer, and one of the downsides is that people aren't going to like controversial (negative) opinions coming from them.

I've seen authors talk trash about negative reviews, complain, complain, complain about how reviewers aren't understanding their book, and generally being bitter about the lack of success.  Even screenshotting bad reviews and inviting their followers to attack the reviewer!

Think for a second here - what benefit does this serve? Do you genuinely think this is helping? Helping me to decide whose book not to buy, maybe.


  • What not to do on tumblr

Tumblr is known for its avid fandom culture. People make edits, people write fan fiction, and people ship characters. It all stops being fun when the author decides it's "hello kids I'm here to ruin the fun " time and starts to comment on every single headcanon of their book and to state what's actually canon according to them. 

Again, this isn't a "I witnessed this one time" thing. This happens quite often and i physically do not understand why authors think it's okay to barge in on fan conversations.

  • If they get tagged or receive a personal message, okay! Be my guest, glad you replied! 
  • If someone actively reaches out to them and ASKS them, okay! 
  • BUT don't just search a tag and decide to ruin everyone's fun by telling them how wrong they are one by one.

The thing is- people can see you, dear authors. 

People check your social media, typically after they have read one of your books or are planning to buy one. It's so, so, so important to keep your mouth shut about some topics that may offend. I'm not saying that you can't express opinions, but sprouting offensive and hateful non-sense and treating your readers horribly doesn't seem like a smart idea, does it? 

If you're one of those people that has too many opinions that may offend, hire a publicist to handle your official account and post your opinions on your personal, non-public account.



The four golden rules for authors on social media

  1. Don't say anything that you wouldn't say in an interview in person
  2. Don't talk trash about the people who pay your bills, oh my god, I can't believe I actually have to say this
  3. Don't chime in on conversations about your book that no one invited you to
  4. DON'T BE A BULLY


Who is on your author blacklist?



More on the Author / Reader relationship:
More YA TALKs

Continue Reading...

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

How I Got Into Book Blogging: I did it for the reviews! | TAG







If you think about it, book blogging is a pretty obscure niche. 
There are so many people I know that proudly claim that they haven't read a book since 6th grade.

Yet somehow there are thousands of book bloggers like us out there, it's insane to think about the amount of book blogs that exist. 

When you're part of the community, it doesn't feel like it's a niche market. But compared to fashion bloggers the number of us book bloggers is pretty low. So I wondered, how did all of you get into this? Feel free to share your story and leave a link in the comments.

I Was a Movie Reviewer!

I actually did movie reviews on a German site similar to Goodreads just for movies for about three or four years before I came across the first book blog. 

I've always liked the thought of sharing my opinion. I'm a pretty opinionated person and I love to shock people with my controversial opinions sometimes. That's why I loved doing movie reviews, you can watch them in two hours max and cram out a bunch of angry reviews every week without putting a lot of effort into it.

...and then I discovered tumblr

This might be news to you, but I've actually had a book blog on tumblr named bookavid way longer than I've had this blog. I still spend way too much time on that site. 

My passion for sharing my opinion without having anyone ask me for it eventually led to tumblr, the ultimate place for angry opinionated internet people. I was probably 16 when I made my first tumblr account and I went through all the typical stages, from fandom, to aesthetic blogger, to social justice. Eventually everyone will come across pretty pictures of books on their tumblr dashes. Only I was the person who didn't continue scrolling but decided to investigate. 

The book blogging community on tumblr is very close and pretty much welcomed me with open arms. 

If you're on tumblr, too, and also an active book blogger, you know that posting reviews there is like shouting into the void. You barely get any discussion there, which is what I craved and was used to doing from my days as a movie reviewer. I didn't know about Goodreads back then, so I fulfilled myself a life long dream to start my own blog. 

I started out horribly, just posting review after review in the hopes that people would just find my blog somehow and start discussing with me. One year later, here I am still posting opinionated reviews, but actually managed to fill my blog up with content a little. 

..........................................

If you're a book blogger, I'm tagging you to make a post telling your readers how you got into book blogging. Feel free to grab the icon and leave the link to your post in the comments.

How did you get into book blogging?

Continue Reading...

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Should tumblr Book Blogs Receive Free Review Copies, Too? | YA Talk





If you're not active on tumblr, you probably have no idea about what's going on in the bookish world there. Tumblr is a micro-blogging site, based on resharing content. There are tons of small communities in tumblr and one of them is centered around bookblogging as well.

What's Going On??

In the last couple of days a few users have stated complaints about not getting review copies and not being recognized as proper "bloggers" in comparison to WordPress/Blogger/Self-hosted users.

The big argument was mainly that tumblr blogging can reach a bigger audience just as easily as regular blogging. Especially users with huge followings said that they know of a lot of people who have bought a certain book solely because they posted about it.

As a micro-blogging site, tumblr works completely different to other blogging sites. You don't need to lift a finger to fill your blog with thousands of posts, all you have to do is reshare content through the "reblogging" option. Some users argued that they do post some original content and get most of their traffic through that. However, I don't think you can say it's the same thing, can you?

Two Sides of the Same Coin?

As a user of both I understand both sides. I get that people who have used tumblr for years want their recognition for having gained a solid following. It's still a fact that tumblr isn't necessarily the right medium if you're looking to reach a big audience and build a following.

Followers on tumblr mostly don't care about the person behind the blog or their content. For instance, I follow around 500 blogs on tumblr and about 80 via Bloglovin'. I actually go through the post of all the regular blogs I follow, while my tumblr dashboard is just a cluttered mess.


As a blogger user I have mixed feelings about this sudden mini uprising. I gained a couple thousand followers by barely doing anything other than reblogging posts on tumblr. I gained around 500 total followers on my Blogger blog with a lot of hard work, hours of refining posts and trying to get my name out there. 

Blogging is hard. Tumblr-ing? Not so much.


From the Publishing Point of View

I perfectly understand why tumblr isn't treated equally to external blogging platforms. First off - it's not blogging at all. It's resharing! It's getting recognition for the content that other people created. I don't even think tumblr users should be allowed to host ads on their sites.

Publishers are always looking for exposure. Review copies are sent out to increase the buzz around a book. Tumblr has a  major impact on teenage culture, but is it really the right platform for literary critique? I scroll past reviews 99% of the time. Tumblr is not the platform I go to when I look for opinions.
Blogging is about stating your opinion. Opinions on tumblr are never a good thing. You get attacked for almost everything on tumblr.

Why would this be different if we all started to post book reviews there?

It's easy to yell injustice, but to me, there is no injustice. Tumblr and third-party-blogging sites aren't the same thing. Why would publishers send out review copies for users of a platform that isn't about reviewing at all?

- Against
  • tumblr users rarely have experience in writing. Remember our first reviews? They were a mess. Everything needs practice. Sending out copies blindly to people just because of their following is a little naive.
  • The effort involved in gaining tumblr fame is dramatically different than effort involved in gaining blogging fame
  • tumblr followings don't even remotely equal to the amount of regular readers
  • Why give out review copies if no one on tumblr reads reviews? There has to be some form of compensation for the authors/publishers
  • Controversy isn't welcome on tumblr, neither are (negative) opinions. How could you judge a book honestly on tumblr without causing a shitstorm?
+ In Favor
  • Gaining a huge tumblr following takes time, too
  • Many people decide to buy books because of tumblr edits
  • Instagram and other websites are recognized as business platforms, too, why not tumblr?
  • Many young adults are more active on tumblr than reading regular blogs


Do you think tumblr bloggers should be treated equal to regular bloggers? Do you think they should get review copies, too?


Link Up: Discussion Challenge @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction



Come back next Tuesday for a new YA Talk! 

More YA Talks:

Continue Reading...
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...